영어과학 English science study

Number Won 2015. 11. 29. 00:58
Nov. 18, 2015
15-213            

NASA Awards Grants to Broaden STEM Education for Underserved Students

NASA's Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) has selected four minority serving institutions for cooperative agreement awards totaling approximately $2 million to help strengthen science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) curricula at the schools.


Four universities were selected to receive MUREP Other Opportunities grants, which provide up to a total of $500,000 to each school, who have three years to create and implement their program. The solicitation challenged schools to propose innovative ways to create and implement STEM activities, with a goal of increasing the number of historically underserved students studying STEM fields relevant to NASA’s diverse exploration mission.


"NASA’s MUREP program provides support for colleges and universities to build programs that connect students from underrepresented and underserved communities with NASA, giving them the strong foundation they need to pursue and excel in STEM fields,” said Donald James, associate administrator for NASA’s Office of Education.


The selected institutions are:

  • University of Hawaii, Honolulu
  • Howard University, Washington
  • The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina


Through MUREP’s competitive awards, NASA provides financial assistance to minority serving institutions, including historically black colleges and universities, Hispanic serving institutions, Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander serving institutions, tribal colleges and universities, and other minority serving institutions and eligible community colleges. These institutions recruit and retain underrepresented and underserved students, including women, girls and persons with disabilities, into STEM fields.


For more information on the award process, visit:


http://nspires.nasaprs.com


For more information on NASA’s education programs, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/education

-end-

Sarah Ramsey
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1694
sarah.ramsey@nasa.gov

Last Updated: Nov. 18, 2015
Editor: Karen Northon
One-Year Crew one
Oct. 21, 2015
M15-154

Texas Students Talk Space with one-Year Space Station Crew

High school students from Lyndon B. Johnson (LBJ) Early College High School in Austin, Texas, will find out what it’s like to spend a year in space when they talk to the one-year crew currently living and working on the International Space Station at 10:25 a.m. EDT on Friday, Oct. 23.


The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.


Space station Commander Scott Kelly of NASA, who recently broke the U.S. astronaut record for longest time in space, and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) will answer questions from students at the LBJ Presidential Library, where the students also will hear a presentation on NASA history and take part in a panel discussion with a number of former astronauts.


Media interested in covering the event at the school must contact Anne Wheeler at awheeler@lbjfoundation.org. The LBJ Presidential Library is located at 2313 Red River St. in Austin. The time of the call is subject to change depending on real-time space station operations.


Kelly and Kornienko launched to the station on March 27 for a year of research into how human bodies respond to long periods of time in microgravity. During their mission, Kelly, Kornienko and their crewmates will conduct more than 250 science investigations in fields such as biology, Earth science, human health research, physical sciences and technology development. on Oct. 16, Kelly broke the record for most time spent in space by an American, surpassing the previous record of 382 cumulative days in space.


This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of the NASA Education Office’s efforts to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning in the United States. Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides them with an authentic, live experience of space exploration, space study and the scientific components of space travel, while introducing them to the possibilities of life in space.


For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv


For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit: 


http://www.nasa.gov/education/stemstation


-end-

Sarah Ramsey
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1694
sarah.ramsey@nasa.gov


Brandi Dean
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
brandi.k.dean@nasa.gov

Last Updated: Oct. 21, 2015
Editor: Sarah Ramsey
NASA Kennedy A child works an activity related to NASA's Launch Services Program
Scientist shows Veggie experiment to children
Dr. Goia Massa, shows the Veggie experiment to children during Community Day at Kennedy Space Center.
Credits: NASA
Demonstration of liquids becoming gases.
Rachel Power demonstrates evaporation for a group using liquid nitrogen and warm water to generate clouds.
Credits: NASA

By Steven Siceloff,
NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla.


The research, tools and theories of spaceflight and science took center stage Saturday afternoon at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex as children and families took part in the center's Community Day.


From an educator dazzling children by making clouds of nitrogen erupt from a bucket to robotics demonstrations to a helicopter and MRAP display, people had lots of competition for their curiosity. Not to mention a show from astronaut Bob Cabana, Kennedy's director, detailing his adventures in orbit assembling the first elements of the International Space Station. There was even a snake, courtesy of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge.


"Anytime you can present science and technology and math to children it's worthwhile," said Mike Tillema, chief of Flight Operations at Kennedy. Answering questions about his helicopter and posing for photos with kids as they sat in the pilot seat, Tilemma said the students show interest from the moment they see the NASA logo-emblazoned Huey. "The young people's look – you can see that interest, the excitement."


The helicopter and MRAP armored vehicle parked by the rocket garden highlighted some of the infrastructure involved with operating NASA's primary spaceport. The helicopters are used in numerous operations year-round including wildlife surveys in addition to launch day work. The MRAPs are relatively new to the center and are being fitted for use as emergency evacuation vehicles for the next generation of human-rated rockets and spacecraft.


Inside the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit area, hundreds of visitors talked space lettuce with the scientists of Veggie whose experimentation produced the first space-grown vegetables consumed by astronauts in space. Children and their parents peered at the leafy plants that were grown on Earth under identical conditions to those on the station, but with gravity of course. The researchers also discussed the importance of growing even a small amount of food in space during long voyages such as those required of the astronauts who will make a journey to Mars.


It wasn't always the people that got the attention during the event. A few robots gathered crowds around them as they and their operators showed off abilities such as shooting basketballs. The robots are part of the FIRST competition that requires students to design and build their own machines for competitions.


"The students are always excited as soon as soon as they see the robots," said James Rallo, a mentor for the Boeing Combbat 21 team. "They want to build the biggest, baddest robot. So we show them where to start and what it can lead to."


Students had plenty of chances to make things and take home creations, too. Paper airplanes and rockets along with scores of coloring pages and collector cards filled NASA shopping bags as the children made their way between the Community Day stations. All of Kennedy's programs were represented, along with NASA's variety of disciplines. Each stop usually ended with a similar message from agency experts: study science and math carefully and you can do this one day.

Last Updated: Oct. 2, 2015
Editor: Steven Siceloff
Robotics
Aug. 12, 2015
M15-075

Texas Students Compete in Space Station Robotics Competition

More than seventy Texas middle school students will watch software they developed compete in space against similar teams from a dozen different states in the national Zero Robotics competition at NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) on Friday, Aug. 14.


Students and members of the Texas Zero Robotics teams will gather at JSC’s Gilruth Center to observe the final competition live as it takes place aboard the International Space Station. Media are invited to attend. Events start at 7:40 a.m. CDT.


Zero Robotics is an opportunity for students to design research that is flown aboard the International Space Station. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. This summer’s teams wrote code to simulate robotic satellites collecting and uploading as many pictures as possible of points of interest on an asteroid while avoiding effects of solar flares.


Texas is one of 11 states participating in this week’s competition, involving more than 650 middle school students from across the nation. Current Expedition 44 crew members Scott Kelly of NASA, Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will conduct the competition aboard the station.


Media interested in attending should contact Dan Huot in JSC’s Office of Communications and Public Affairs at 281-483-5111 or daniel.g.huot@nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. Aug. 13.


For more about the SPHERES Zero Robotics Challenge, visit:


http://zerorobotics.mit.edu/


For more about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station  

-end-


Dan Huot
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
daniel.g.huot@nasa.gov

Last Updated: Aug. 12, 2015
Editor: Christina Canales
June 27, 2015
20-15

‘Forever Remembered’ Exhibit Honoring Challenger and Columbia Opens at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex

Entrance to Forever Remembered Exhibit
A permanent memorial, "Forever Remembered," is unveiled June 27 in the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. NASA and astronaut families collaborated on the memorial designed to honor the crews lost on missions STS-51L and STS-107, pay tribute to shuttle vehicles Challenger and Columbia, and emphasize the importance of learning from the past. Encompassing nearly 2,000 square feet, the memorial contains the largest collection of memorabilia and personal items of both flight crews. It also includes recovered hardware from both Challenger and Columbia, never before displayed for the public.
Credits: Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA and the families of the crews of space shuttle missions STS-51L and STS-107 have collaborated to create a new, permanent memorial designed to honor the astronauts, pay tribute to orbiters Challenger and Columbia, and emphasize the importance of learning from the past. “Forever Remembered” opened Saturday at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, where it completes NASA’s 30-year Space Shuttle Program story told throughout the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit.


Encompassing nearly 2,000 square feet, the memorial contains the largest collection of personal items of both flight crews. It also includes recovered hardware from both Challenger and Columbia, never before on display for viewing by the public.


Family members were present at a small ceremony as the memorial was formally opened by NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, both veteran shuttle astronauts.


“The crews of Challenger and Columbia are forever a part of a story that is ongoing,” Bolden said. “It is the story of humankind’s evolving journey into space, the unknown, and the outer-reaches of knowledge, discovery and possibility. It is a story of hope.”


The Space Shuttle Program story is full of spectacular successes. From its maiden voyage in 1981 to its final touchdown in 2011, the capable, reusable delta-winged vehicle captivated a generation. Teams of astronauts pulled off seemingly impossible feats in Earth orbit while a cast of thousands supported them from the ground.


But the shuttle story also includes the losses of 14 courageous astronauts and the nation's first two shuttles, Columbia and Challenger. The tragedies galvanized the agency to learn from these painful events, not only to safely return the shuttle fleet to flight, but to help assure the safety of future explorers.


Temperatures at Kennedy Space Center were just a few degrees above freezing on the morning of Jan. 28, 1986, as Challenger lifted off on its 10th mission, STS-51L. one minute and 13 seconds into the flight, a booster failure caused an explosion that destroyed the vehicle, resulting in the loss of the crew of seven astronauts: Commander Francis Scobee, Pilot Michael J. Smith, Mission Specialists Judith Resnik, Ellison onizuka and Ronald McNair, and Payload Specialists Gregory Jarvis and Christa McAuliffe, a New Hampshire schoolteacher.


Seventeen years later, on Jan. 16, 2003, NASA’s flagship orbiter Columbia thundered into orbit on STS-107, a 16-day science mission. on board were Commander Rick Husband, Pilot Willie McCool, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, David Brown and Laurel Clark, and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon, Israel’s first astronaut. on Feb. 1, 2003, the orbiter broke apart in the skies above east Texas as it re-entered Earth’s atmosphere on the way to a planned landing at Kennedy. Seven more lives were lost.


“I believe that it’s important to share this story with everyone, and not just push it aside, or try to hide it,” Cabana said. “These crews and these vehicles are part of who we are as an agency, and a nation. They tell the story of our never ending quest to explore, and our undying spirit to never give up.”


"Forever Remembered” is designed to be an emotional experience, according to NASA’s Mike Ciannilli, who has been NASA’s lead on the memorial project since it began about four years ago. At the time, Ciannilli was a NASA Test Director and Landing Recovery Director.


"Emotion is timeless," Ciannilli explained. "It's important that we don't lock this experience into a certain time, a certain place."


Visitors enter the memorial through a doorway flanked by the STS-51L and STS-107 mission patches. The orbiter and crew are remembered through individual collections lining the walls: Challenger on the left, Columbia on the right. The items were carefully chosen to share each astronaut’s passions, talents and achievements, allowing their personalities to shine through.


Items include Husband’s cowboy boots and Bible, a small aircraft Smith hand-carved for his wife, Anderson’s vintage Star Trek lunch box, and a research paper authored by Judy Resnik, displayed alongside sheet music for violin and piano. There are flight jackets, family photographs and numerous other artifacts offering a glimpse into the people behind the names on the mission patches. Many items were loaned by the families; others belong to NASA.


“The families have been unbelievably gracious, inspiring, warm and giving,” Ciannilli said. “There were times they provided comfort to me as I worked on this, and still do.”


At the end of the first hall, the warmth of the astronauts’ collections gives way to a small gallery where guests will see firsthand the toll these events took on the shuttle hardware. A section of Challenger’s fuselage displaying the American flag stands at left; on the right, the flight deck windows of Columbia are placed at eye level.  


“When I look into those windows, I see John Young and Bob Crippen preparing to launch on the boldest test flight in history, the first flight of America’s space shuttle, Columbia,” Cabana said.


“I see a much younger Bob Cabana launching to space on his first command, and I see Rick and Willie and the rest of the 107 crew smiling and experiencing the wonders of space on the final flight of Columbia.”


While great care has been taken to preserve the pieces, they’re real, bearing the scars of the trauma each shuttle endured.


“Forever Remembered” concludes with a focus on the recovery and return-to-flight efforts, including the emotional toll these events had on the nation, the challenges involved in recovery, and the triumph of return to flight. A looping video shares heartfelt letters written by children as they shared their condolences and messages of hope.                                                                                                                                                         

After each loss, investigators spent months looking at recovered hardware, poring over data and conducting analysis to determine what had gone wrong. A second video reveals rarely seen photos and footage of this painstaking process.


The space shuttle team pulled together to fix the problems and return the program to flight each time. Any less effort would not have honored the fallen astronauts or their missions. Shuttle Atlantis, on display nearby, flew the final mission of the Space Shuttle Program, STS-135.


“The artifacts here on display are not easy to look at. Many of them are on display for the very first time,” Bolden said. “It is our hope that by making them available for the public to view, we will help remind the world, that every launch, every discovery, every measure of progress, is possible only because of the sacrifice of those we have lost.”


For information about Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, visit:


http://www.kennedyspacecenter.com


-end-


Michael Curie
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
321-867-2468
michael.curie@nasa.gov


Andrea Farmer
Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Fla.
321-449-4318
afarmer@delawarenorth.com

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Kay Grinter
May 29, 2015
M15-086

Actor Jon Cryer Voices New NASA Film to Help Celebrate 50 Years of Spacewalks

On June 3, 1965, NASA astronaut Ed White became the first American to walk in space. NASA is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the United States’ first extravehicular activity (EVA) -- better known as a spacewalk -- through a number of commemorative features on NASA Television and NASA.gov.

Astronaut on a spacewalk
Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, STS 41-B mission specialist, participates in the first use of a nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled device called the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), which allows for much greater mobility than that afforded previous space walkers who had to use restrictive tethers. He is pictured a few meters away from the cabin of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Challenger.
Credits: NASA

On Monday, June 1, NASA will premiere a documentary narrated by actor Jon Cryer on the history and future of humans working on a tether in space. The film, Suit Up, marks five decades of spacewalks and will air on NASA Television starting at 10 a.m. EDT, and be available on the agency’s website and YouTube account.

The documentary features interviews with NASA Administrator and astronaut, Charles Bolden, NASA Deputy Administrator and spacesuit designer, Dava Newman, as well as other astronauts, engineers, technicians, managers and luminaries of spacewalk history. They share their personal stories that cover the full EVA experience-- from spacesuit manufacturing to spacewalk maneuvering -- all brought to life through historical and HD footage.


Visitors to NASA.gov’s Suit Up site can view special features and videos spanning NASA’s 50 years of spacewalks and spacesuits.


From 7:15 to 9:15 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, June 2, NASA astronaut and veteran spacewalker Mike Foreman is available to discuss with media the dramatic history and exciting future of spacewalking. The public can watch Foreman live from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston where astronauts do EVA training. Foreman will talk about the first U.S. spacewalk and answer media questions about the past 50 years of spacewalks through the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs.


For NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv


-end-

Karen Northon
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1540
karen.northon@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Sarah Ramsey
Technology SBIR technology proposes to further develop Unmanned Aircraft Systems.
April 30, 2015
15-073

NASA Invests in Hundreds of U.S. Small Businesses to Enable Future Missions

NASA has selected research and technology proposals from 254 small businesses and 39 research institutions in the United States for grants to develop new technologies that will further NASA's journey to Mars.


The proposals are solicited, vetted and managed through NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Proposals that lead to the successful development of ideas and products could result in contracts with a combined approximate value of $47.7 million.


"The selected proposals demonstrate the ingenuity and creativity of America's small businesses," said Steve Jurczyk, associate administrator for the agency’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "Enabling NASA's future missions, including human exploration of Mars, requires broad participation, and the SBIR/STTR Programs ensure the agency is benefiting from the passionate and determined minds of the private sector."


NASA is funding proposals that will enable space transportation for human and robotic missions, new ways to protect astronauts in space, and innovative ways to keep spacecraft systems operational -- technologies that may, one day, find their way into the vehicles and systems used to explore the solar system.


Selected proposals also include technologies that could enable landing on, traversing across and sampling asteroids, Mars or other distant destinations, searching the sky for planets outside our solar system, and studying the universe back to the beginning of time.


For example, NASA hopes to develop a cognitive space communications network with the ability to adapt to environmental changes and network growth, thereby increasing system reliability. The communications systems would autonomously sense environmental conditions, rapidly analyze the data and configure the controls to adapt to those conditions. Addressing this concept, one selected proposal seeks to demonstrate a software-defined cognitive radio that would play a critical role in the operation of this network. The radio’s software autonomously senses local and system conditions, rapidly analyses those conditions and responds accordingly. 


NASA's SBIR and STTR programs fund technologies used here on Earth, as well. Some proposals target technologies crucial to the development of next generation aircraft that are quieter and more efficient, air traffic management systems that are more capable, and improved Earth-observing spacecraft to study the planet and provide invaluable information about the impacts of climate change.


This includes technologies to advance water recovery systems. Currently, water recovery systems aboard the International Space Station are able to recover about 85 percent of water from astronauts' urine, while the other 15 percent is left in what is referred to as brine. As water is removed from brine, the solids within the brine must be captured and filtered out. The leftover brine requires space and weight on resupply missions that could otherwise go to science and research. one selected proposal examines methods for the disposal of brine, which could have benefits in areas of the world where clean water is scarcer.


The highly competitive programs have three award phases. Phase I feasibility studies evaluate the scientific and technical merit of an idea. Phase I awards are for six months and a maximum of $125,000. Firms that successfully complete this phase are eligible to submit a proposal for Phase II proposal, during which selectees will expand on the results of the developments in Phase I. Phase III awards examine the commercialization of Phase II results and requires the use of private sector, non-SBIR, funding.


The three solicitations garnered proposals from 37 states. For the general SBIR Phase I solicitation, NASA chose 324 proposals with a total value of approximately $40.5 million. For the SBIR Phase I select solicitation, NASA chose seven proposals with a total value of approximately $875,000. NASA chose 50 proposals with a total value of approximately $6.3 million for STTR Phase I projects.


Selection criteria included technical merit and feasibility, along with experience, qualifications and facilities. Additional criteria included effectiveness of the work plan and commercial potential and feasibility.


NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California manages the SBIR program for STMD. NASA's 10 centers manage individual projects. For more information about NASA's SBIR program and a complete listing of selected companies, visit:


http://sbir.nasa.gov


These innovative technology programs are part of STMD, which is innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions. NASA's investments in technology provide the transformative capabilities to enable new missions, stimulate the economy, contribute to the nation's global competitiveness and inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers and explorers. For more information about NASA's investment in space technology, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech


-end-

Joshua Buck
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1130
jbuck@nasa.gov


Maria Alberty
Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
650-604-4789
maria.alberty@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Karen Northon
NASA Langley
Feb. 24, 2015
15-009

New Langley Professor Named at National Institute of Aerospace

The National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) has a new Langley Distinguished Professor in Advanced Aerospace Systems Architecture for the Georgia Institute of Technology.

He is Dr. Dimitri Mavris, director of the Georgia Tech School of Aerospace Engineering' s Aerospace Systems Design Lab (ASDL). Mavris replaces his former colleague, Dr. Alan Wilhite, who retired after serving 10 years.

"It is a great honor – and an even greater opportunity – to assume the Langley Distinguished Professorship," said Mavris, who also serves as Georgia Tech's Boeing Professor for Advanced Aerospace Systems Analysis. "We are at a time in history when the potential for collaboration between NASA, the academic community and the private sector shows incredible promise. I look forward to moving that process along."

The National Institute of Aerospace is a non-profit research and graduate institute, located near NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was created to support Langley's mission to do cutting-edge aerospace and atmospheric research, develop new technologies and help train the next generation of scientists and engineers. NASA Langley also helps contribute to the funding for the Langley professorships.

"I am very excited that someone of Dr. Mavris' stature and vision will be joining the NIA to perform transformational aerospace research," said Dr. Douglas O. Stanley, president and executive director of the NIA. "I look forward to working closely with him as we create ASDL@NIA to lead the development of innovative aerospace concepts and design methods."

Mavris will split his time between Atlanta and Hampton, where he will be the principal Georgia Tech faculty member resident at NIA. He will lead NIA's research program in the field of systems analysis, with primary emphasis on developing life-cycle systems analysis and risk methodologies for advanced aerospace system architectures.

The professor earned his undergraduate, masters, and doctoral degrees in aerospace engineering from Georgia Tech. His research has focused on the formulation, development and implementation of comprehensive approaches to the design of affordable high-quality complex systems using visual analytics.

Under Mavris' direction, the ASDL has served as a hub of multi-disciplinary system design and analysis work for a number of government and industry sponsors. Over the last 10 years, the lab has done $125 million worth of research in new methods and tools and employed more than 200 research faculty, masters, and doctoral students.

Mavris now joins five other Langley Professors, each of whom holds a teaching and research faculty appointment at one of six NIA founding member universities. They will work as an integrated team with the NIA and NASA Langley research community, and the NIA liaison professors at the six NIA founding universities.

Also joining the team will be Georgia Tech' s Dr. Brian German as the new Langley Associate Professor and Dr. Daniel P. Schrage returning as the Georgia Tech Liaison Professor.

NIA was formed by a consortium of universities and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Foundation. The roster of major research universities includes consortium members: Georgia Tech in Atlanta; Hampton University in Hampton; North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro; North Carolina State University in Raleigh; University of Maryland, College Park; University of Virginia in Charlottesville; Virginia Tech in Blacksburg; and affiliate members Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, and the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.

For more information about NASA Langley, please go to:

www.nasa.gov/langley

For more information about the National Institute of Aerospace, please visit:

www.nianet.org

–end–


NASA Langley news releases are available automatically by sending an e-mail message to langley-news-request@lists.nasa.gov with the word "subscribe" in the subject line. You will receive an e-mail instructing you to reply to confirm the action. To unsubscribe, send an email message to langley-news-request@lists.nasa.gov with the word "unsubscribe" in the subject line.



Kathy Barnstorff
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia
757-864-9886/344-8511
kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov


Harla Sherwood
National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Virginia
harla.sherwood@nianet.org
757-636-6300


Jason Maderer
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia
jason.maderer@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-2966

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Bob Allen
NASA Langley
Feb. 4, 2015
15-005

NASA/NIA Announce 2015 RASC-AL Competition Finalists

Sixteen teams have made it to the finals of a NASA and National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) engineering design competition that challenged university students to think about the conditions astronauts will face as they venture beyond low Earth orbit.

The undergraduate and graduate engineering students won the right to compete against each other at the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage or RASC-AL forum to be held in Cocoa Beach, Fla., June 14-17. That is where they will present their research, including a technical paper and poster, to a panel of NASA and industry experts

"In the 2020's NASA will have a transportation system based on the SLS and Orion that can ferry crews to orbits beyond the moon,” says Pat Troutman, Human Exploration Strategic Analysis lead at NASA Langley Research Center.  “This deep space proving ground will allow us to develop and demonstrate capabilities required for future Mars missions."

The teams that will tackle some of the same difficult deep space challenges facing NASA engineers and scientists include three from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida and one each from Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Georgia Tech in Atlanta; Pennsylvania State University, State College; University of California, Davis; University of Colorado in Boulder; University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbanna; University of Maryland in College Park; University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; University of South California, Los Angeles; University of Texas at Austin;  and Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.

Two joint teams will also participate. one includes West Virginia University in Morgantown and State University of New York at Fredonia. The other includes the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena; Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts; Princeton University in New Jersey; Stanford University in Palo Alto, California; University of California, Berkeley; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; North Carolina State University in Raleigh and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

The teams will work over the next five months to develop a mission focused on one of four space-pioneering concepts or themes that promote developing new technologies that could allow astronauts to be less dependent on resources transported from Earth. Those themes are Earth independent Mars pioneering; Earth independent lunar pioneering; Mars moons prospector and large-scale Mars entry, descent and landing.

The top two winning teams will receive a travel stipend to attend the AIAA Space 2015 Conference at the end of summer in Pasadena, California, where they will present a condensed version of their RASC-AL concept to industry colleagues.

By participating in this design competition, which is sponsored by NASA’s Human Exploration Operations and Missions Directorate, students receive real-world experience that parallels what NASA engineers are doing. In some cases, their work may augment what NASA is working on by proposing a revolutionary concept or solution that could be incorporated into NASA human space exploration planning. RASC-AL also contributes to NASA’s efforts to develop a highly skilled workforce, while also gaining innovative ideas from some of the best student minds in the country.

For more information about the RASC-AL competition, visit:

www.nianet.org/RASCAL

For more information about NASA Langley, please go to:

www.nasa.gov/langley

For more information about the National Institute of Aerospace, please visit:

www.nianet.org

- end -


NASA Langley news releases are available automatically by sending an e-mail message to langley-news-request@lists.nasa.gov with the word "subscribe" in the subject line. You will receive an e-mail instructing you to reply to confirm the action.  To unsubscribe, send an e-mail message to langley-news-request@lists.nasa.gov with the word "unsubscribe" in the subject line.



Kathy Barnstorff
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.
757-864-9886/344-8511
kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov


Harla Sherwood
National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Va.
harla.sherwood@nianet.org
757-636-6300

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Bob Allen
3-D Printing Robert Hillan of Enterprise, Alabama, won first place in the Teen Group in the 3-D printing challenge
Jan. 29, 2015
15-015

Alabama and Washington Students Selected for Winning Designs of 3-D Printed Tools for Astronauts

After three months of designing and modeling, a panel of judges from NASA, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Foundation (ASME) and Made In Space Inc. in California, have selected the winners of the Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space Tool Challenge.

The winner from the Teen Group (ages 13-19) is a Multipurpose Precision Maintenance Tool that Robert Hillan of Enterprise, Alabama, designed. The winner of the Junior Group (ages 5-12) is a Space Planter that Sydney Vernon from Bellevue, Washington, designed.

"This challenge has been an amazing experience which taught me many educational skills that will greatly benefit me in the future," said Hillan. "It has given me an opportunity to put something on the space station, something I've always wanted to do and I'm so grateful I was able to participate."

The challenge asked students in grades K-12 to use their imagination to create and submit a digital 3-D model of a tool they think astronauts could use in space.

“If an astronaut tool breaks, future space pioneers won’t be able to go to the local hardware store to purchase a replacement, but with 3-D printing they will be able to create their own replacement or even create tools we’ve never seen before.” said Niki Werkheiser, NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing Project Manager at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

This challenge tapped into the creativity and ingenuity of our nation’s future engineers to imagine interesting solutions to potential mission related problems. Models were received from 470 students across the United States.

The winning student in the teen category will watch from NASA’s Payload Operations Integration Center at the Marshall Center with the mission control team as their design is printed aboard the International Space Station. The winning student in the junior category will receive a 3-D printer for their school. Winners were selected after a panel of expert judges interviewed the four highest rated winners from each age group. The panel members were Werkheiser, Mike Snyder, head of research and development, Made In Space Inc.; and NASA astronauts Reid Wiseman and Yvonne Cagle.

The top 10 entries from each age group are:

Teen Group

Junior Group

  • Logan Castaldo, East Greenwich, Rhode Island – Rope of Usefulness  (semifinalist)
  • Aditya Hegde, San Diego, California – Sticky Grippers  (semifinalist)
  • John Humpherys, Treasure Island, Florida – Handy Helper  (semifinalist)
  • Maria Quinn, Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin – Cup Clamp  (semifinalist)
  • Trisha Sathish, Cupertino, California – Container O Storage  (semifinalist)
  • Nagasai Sreyash Sola, Ashburn, Virginia – Astro Multi-Tool  (semifinalist)

The Space Tool Challenge is the first in a series of Future Engineers 3-D Printing challenges for students focused on designing solutions to real-world space exploration problems. They are conducted by the ASME Foundation in collaboration with NASA and were announced in June as part of the White House Maker Faire to empower America’s students to invent the future by bringing their ideas to life. The next challenge will be announced in April 2015.

The challenge supports NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate’s 3-D Printing in Zero-G International Space Station Technology Demonstration whose goal is to demonstrate the capability of utilizing a 3-D printer for in-space additive manufacturing technology. This is the first step toward realizing an additive manufacturing, print-on-demand “machine shop” for long-duration missions and sustaining human exploration of other planets, where there is extremely limited ability and availability of Earth-based logistics support.

For additional information about the winners, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/1BA9bGV

To see all the winning designs and for additional information about the Future Engineers 3-D Printing in Space Challenges, visit:

http://www.futureengineers.org

For additional information on the 3-D Printing in Zero-G Technology Demonstration, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/3Dprinting/

> Read Full Feature

Stephanie Schierholz
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov


Tracy McMahan
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
Tracy.Mcmahan@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Jennifer Harbaugh
SLS Booster Test
Jan. 29, 2015
M15-014

NASA Invites Media, Social Media to Major Space Launch System Booster Test

Media and social media followers are invited to watch as NASA tests the largest, most powerful booster ever built March 11 at ATK Aerospace System's test facility in Promontory, Utah. The booster will power NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), which will be used to help send humans to deep space destinations including an asteroid and Mars.

The two-minute, full-duration static test is a significant milestone in the development of the SLS and comes after years of development to qualify the booster design performance at the highest end of the booster’s accepted temperature range. once this test and a second, low-temperature test planned for early 2016, are complete, the hardware will be ready to help send the rocket, with NASA’s Orion spacecraft atop it, on its first flight test.

Forty-five social media participants will be selected to attend a NASA Social March 10 and 11, which include tours of ATK facilities, interviews with NASA and ATK officials and a chance to view the powerful test firing. Social media followers can apply to attend the event at:

http://www.nasa.gov/sls-hot-fire-social  

All social media accreditation applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Details and rules for social media accreditation also are listed on the website.

U.S. media must contact ATK's Kay Anderson at 435-230-2787 or kay.anderson@atk.com to request credentials. Registration for foreign national media and NASA Social applicants closes at 5 p.m. EST Sunday, Feb. 8. Registration for U.S. citizens closes at 5 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16.

During the test, 103 design objectives will be measured through more than 534 instrumentation channels on the booster. It will be heated to 90 degrees Fahrenheit to measure solid rocket booster performance at high temperatures, and demonstrate it meets applicable structural and ballistic requirements. Other objectives include data gathering on vital motor upgrades, such as the new insulation and booster case liner and the redesigned nozzle, which increase the robustness of the design.

When completed, two five-segment, solid-rocket boosters and four RS-25 main engines will power the SLS on deep space missions. The boosters operate in parallel with the main engines for the first two minutes of flight, providing more than 75 percent of the thrust needed for the launch vehicle to escape Earth’s gravitational pull.

The first flight test of SLS will feature a configuration for a 70-metric-ton (77 ton) lift capacity and carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit to test the performance of the integrated system. As the SLS is upgraded, it will provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130-metric-tons (143 tons) to enable missions even farther into our solar system.

For more information on SLS, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/sls                 

 

-end-

Rachel Kraft
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
rachel.h.kraft@nasa.gov

 

Kim Henry                                                                                                   
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
256-544-0034
kimberly.h.henry@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Sarah Ramsey
Jan. 28, 2015
M15-007

NASA Hosts Media, Social Media for “State of NASA” Events at Agency Centers

NASA centers across the country are opening their doors Monday, Feb. 2 to media and social media for “State of NASA” events, unique opportunities for a behind-the-scenes look at the agency’s work on its journey to Mars.

Events at NASA centers will include media tours and presentations on the cutting-edge technologies developed and under development, as well as the scientific discoveries made as NASA studies our changing Earth and the infinite universe, and progresses toward the next generation of air travel.   

Additionally, each center will connect via NASA Television with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden at 1:30 p.m. EST at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden will address the agency’s scientific and technological achievements and the exciting work ahead as we push farther in the solar system and lead the world in a new era of exploration.

Questions will be taken from media in attendance at Kennedy. The briefing will air live on NASA TV and the agency's website.

U.S. media must apply for credentials to attend Monday’s event at Kennedy by noon on Friday, Jan. 30. All media must present two forms of unexpired government issued identification to access Kennedy. one form must be a photo ID, such as a passport or driver's license. Badges will be issued at the Kennedy Badging Office located on State Road 405 east of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Journalists must arrive at Kennedy's Press Site by 12:15 p.m. Monday for transportation to the event. The deadline for international media has passed. Media accreditation requests must be submitted online at:

https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

At 4 p.m. Monday, agency Chief Financial Officer David Radzanowski will brief media on NASA’s 2016 budget proposal. To participate in this briefing, media need to contact Karen Northon in the NASA Headquarters newsroom at 202-358-1540 or karen.northon@nasa.gov no later than 3 p.m.

Audio and visuals from the media teleconference will be streamed live on NASA's website and on Ustream at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

The NASA budget and supporting information will be available online Monday afternoon, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/budget

-end-

Allard Beutel
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-2191
allard.beutel@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Karen Northon

NASA will pay tribute to the crews of Apollo 1 and space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, as well as other NASA colleagues, during the agency's annual Day of Remembrance Wednesday, Jan. 28.

NASA's Day of Remembrance honors members of the NASA family who lost their lives while furthering the cause of exploration and discovery. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and other agency senior officials will hold an observance and wreath-laying at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Following the wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington, various NASA centers will hold remembrance events for their employees. Kennedy Space Center in Florida will hold a brief ceremony, led by center deputy director Janet Petro, at 10:30 a.m. at the Space Mirror Memorial, located on the grounds of the visitors complex. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, will hold a candle lighting ceremony led by center director Patrick Scheuermann and astronaut Robert “Hoot” Gibson at 9 a.m. CST Thursday, Jan. 29.

The agency also is paying tribute to its fallen astronauts with special online content available at:

http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/DOR2015/

Images of the Day of Remembrance commemoration at Arlington National Cemetery will posted online at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqphoto/

-end-

Allard Beutel
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-2191
allard.beutel@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Karen Northon
International Space Station
Aug. 25, 2014
M14-141

Space Station Astronauts to Speak with California Elementary School Students

Expedition 40 Commander Steve Swanson and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, currently orbiting Earth aboard the International Space Station, will speak with students and educators at Elliott Ranch Elementary School in Elk Grove, California, Wednesday, Aug. 27.

The event, which begins at 1:10 p.m. EDT (10:10 a.m. PDT) will be broadcast live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Elliott Ranch focused its 2014 science fair on NASA and encouraged exploration-related experiments. Throughout the summer, students worked to develop projects that could lead to meaningful questions for the astronauts about life, work and research aboard the space station. Students with winning projects will speak with Swanson and Wiseman during the live downlink. Prior to the event, former NASA astronaut Stephen Robinson will visit the school to share his experiences living and working in space.

Media interested in covering the event must contact Matt Hessburg at 646-942-1429 or mhessburg@gmail.com. Elliott Ranch Elementary School is located at 10000 East Taron Drive in Elk Grove, California.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides an authentic, live experience of space exploration, space study, the scientific components of space travel and the possibilities of life in space.

This in-flight education downlink is one in a series with educational organizations in the United States and abroad to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning. It is an integral component of NASA's Teaching From Space education program, which promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA's human spaceflight program.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For information about NASA's education programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

For information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

To follow social media updates from Expedition 40 astronauts, visit:

https://twitter.com/astro_reid

http://instagram.com/iss

-end-
 

Ann Marie Trotta        
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1601
ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov

Ashlé Harris
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
ashle.s.harris@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Karen Northon
International Space Station
June 23, 2014
M14-109

NASA Kicks off New Space Station Exhibit with Live Space Chat with San Diego Students

Local students and educators will gather at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego at 10:25 a.m. PDT (1:25 p.m. EDT) Wednesday, June 25, to speak with NASA astronauts Steve Swanson and Reid Wiseman, currently orbiting Earth aboard the International Space Station.

The event will be broadcast live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. Media interested in covering the event must contact Claire Caraska at 619-685-5743 or ccaraska@rhfleet.org. The science center is located at 1875 El Prado in San Diego.

Space station Expedition 40 Commander Swanson and Flight Engineer Wiseman will answer questions and discuss how research conducted in space benefits humankind.  The 20-minute space chat will kick off a series of events planned as part of Destination Station: San Diego – a new NASA multimedia exhibit at the Fleet Center.

Students will ask the astronauts questions about life, work and research aboard the orbiting space station. Teachers have been preparing the students at for the conversation with the crew by incorporating NASA activities in their lessons, creating awareness about the International Space Station and encouraging students to pursue careers in fields related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

San Diego area schools and community groups participating in the event include: Barrio Logan College Institute, Broadway Heights Community Council, Elementary Institute of Science, Feaster Charter Elementary School, Logan K-8 School and South Bay Family YMCA.

Destination Station is a new NASA traveling exhibit that showcases space station research opportunities, informs the public about current station activities and communicates the current and potential future benefits of the station on everyday life here on Earth. The exhibit opens July 7 and is free with admission to the Fleet Center through September 2.

Linking students directly to the astronauts aboard the space station provides students with a unique, live experience of space exploration, space study, the scientific components of space travel and life in space. This in-flight education downlink is one in a series with educational organizations in the United States to improve STEM teaching and learning. It is an integral component of NASA's Teaching From Space education program, which promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA's human spaceflight program.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For information about NASA's education programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education


For information about the International Space Station, visit:


http://www.nasa.gov/station

and

http://www.nasa.gov/destinationstation

To follow social media updates from Wiseman and other Expedition 40 astronauts, visit:

https://twitter.com/astro_reid

and

http://instagram.com/iss

-end-

Ann Marie Trotta
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1601
ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov

Ashlé Harris
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
ashle.s.harris@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Karen Northon
NASA Leadership
May 6, 2014

NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Event

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to students from Mapletown Jr/Sr High School and Margaret Bell Middle School during the

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to students from Mapletown Jr/Sr High School and Margaret Bell Middle School during the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Research Project Capstone Event in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters on Monday, May 5, 2014. Administrator Bolden spoke about his involvement with the Hubble Space Telescope and took questions from the students.

Photo Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Sarah Loff
Aeronautics
March 14, 2014
M14-048

Media Invited to Tour Ames Research Center with NASA Administrator

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden will visit the agency's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., on the afternoon of Monday, March 17, for demonstrations of and briefings on select aeronautics and space research activities performed at the center.

Media are invited to attend Bolden’s tour of the laboratory used for research on volleyball-sized free-flying satellites called Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, which are currently aboard the International Space Station. SPHERES are used on the space station to conduct experiments in space robotics, as well as spacecraft guidance navigation, control and docking. The satellites provide opportunities to affordably test a wide range of hardware and software.

Interested media may also attend Bolden’s tour of the center's high-fidelity airport control tower simulator, dubbed Future Flight Central, where the administrator will be briefed on research underway in support of next-generation air traffic management. NASA is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration and industry partners to develop several advanced automation tools that provide air traffic controllers, pilots, and other airspace users with more accurate real-time information about the nation’s air traffic flow, weather and routing.

Following the tours and briefings, Bolden will be available for a question-and-answer session with attending media. News media interested in attending should contact Sharon Lozano at sharon.k.lozano@nasa.gov or 650-604-4789 by 9 a.m. PDT Monday, March 17, to register.

Registered news media may arrive as early as 11:45 a.m. March 17 at the Visitor Badging Office located at the main gate. Government-issued photo ID is required to obtain a visitor badge. News media will be escorted to and from the event Media arriving early will have an opportunity to interview SPHERES experts before Bolden’s arrival. All media must be at the main gate by 12:30 p.m.

For more information about Ames, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ames

-end-
 

Lauren B. Worley
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1288
lauren.b.worley@nasa.gov

Sharon Lozano
Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
650-604-4789
sharon.k.lozano@nasa.gov
 

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Sonja Alexander
CubeSats
Nov. 20, 2013
13-343

NASA Helps Launch Student-Built Satellites as Part of CubeSat Launch Initiative

NASA is beginning to receive confirmation 11 small cubesat research satellites, including the first developed by high school students, that were launched into space Tuesday night from the Virginia coast are operating as planned.

The cubesats were included as auxiliary payloads aboard a U.S. Air Force Minotaur 1 rocket that lifted off from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility at 8:15 p.m. EST. The cubesats, NASA's fourth Educational Launch of Nanosatellite (ELaNa) mission, deployed from their protective cases into Earth's orbit about 20 minutes after liftoff.

As the miniature satellites come online, the teams responsible for them are beginning to receive signals. Although it could take several more days for full confirmation, all of the cubesats appear to be doing well in their new home in low-Earth orbit. The teams are responsible for confirming activation and normal operations of the cubesats.

''Cubesats offer our best and brightest young minds the opportunity to discover the excitement of space exploration while confronting the tough technology and engineering challenges surrounding spaceflight," said Leland Melvin, NASA's associate administrator for education in Washington. "By opening the space frontier to a new generation of scientists and engineers, we encourage students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics."

Cubesats are a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The cube-shaped satellites measure about 4 inches on each side, have a volume of about 1 quart and weigh less than 3 pounds. Cubesat research addresses science, exploration, technology development, education or space missions.

"The advancements of the cubesat community are enabling an acceleration of flight-qualified technology that will ripple through the aerospace industry," said Jason Crusan, director of NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Division, which oversees the CubeSat Launch Initiative. "Our future missions will be standing on the developments the cubesat community has enabled."

Cubesats from nine universities, a NASA center and a high school were launched. The TJ3Sat from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology of Alexandria, Va., contains a voice synthesizer module that will take written phrases in the form of code and produce a phonetic voice reading on the satellite's downlink frequencies. TJ3Sat is the first NASA-sponsored cubesat developed by high school students.

Also sent into orbit was PhoneSat 2.4, a second-generation smartphone cubesat mission sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate. Phonesat 2.4 will test the smartphone's capability as communication technology for nanosatellites and as hardware to manage pointing, taking images and software execution. PhoneSat 2.4 has several improvements over the previous mission, including a two-way radio to enable command of the satellite from the ground, solar arrays to enable it to be operational for up to a year, and a system for attitude control.

More than 300 students from the following institutions were involved in preparing the 11 cubesats:

-- Thomas Jefferson High School
-- Drexel University, Philadelphia, in collaboration with the United States Naval Academy
-- NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.
-- St. Louis University, St. Louis
-- University of Alabama, Huntsville, Ala.,
-- University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
-- University of Hawaii, Honolulu
-- University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., in collaboration with Morehead State University, Morehead, Ky.
-- The University of Louisiana, Lafayette, La.
-- University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M.
-- Vermont Technical College, Randolph Center, Vt.

The launch also marks the first flight of the Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS), a satellite deployment system built by Ames. NLAS is capable of carrying approximately 100 pounds of secondary payloads into orbit, and can accommodate various configurations of cubesats.

ELaNa missions, conducted under NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative, give students, teachers and faculty hands-on experience developing flight hardware by providing access to a low-cost avenue for research. Since its inception in 2010, the CubeSat Launch Initiative has selected more than 90 cubesats from primarily educational and government institutions around the United States. NASA chose these miniature satellites from respondents to public announcements for the agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative. NASA has a current call for proposals due Nov. 26.

For additional information about NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative

For additional information about ELaNa 4, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/18i2YFk

For more information about NASA's PhoneSat 2.4 mission, visit:

http://go.usa.gov/WQSA

-end-

Joshua Buck
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
jbuck@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Sonja Alexander
International Space Station
Aug. 12, 2013
M13-129

NASA Astronauts Chat Live from Space with California Students

International Space Station crew members Karen Nyberg and Chris Cassidy will speak live from the orbiting science laboratory with high school students at the Riverside Preparatory Academy in Oro Grande, Calif., at 10:40 a.m. PDT (1:40 p.m. EDT) Thursday, Aug 15.

News media representatives are invited to attend and cover the 20-minute event, which also will be broadcast live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. To attend the event, journalists should contact John Tucker at 760-243-4136. The school is located at 19900 National Trails Highway in Oro Grande.

Linking students directly to the astronauts aboard the space station provides them with an authentic, live experience of space exploration, space study, the scientific components of space travel, and the possibilities of life in space.

This in-flight education downlink is one in a series of such events with educational organizations in the United States to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning. It is also an integral component of NASA's “Teaching From Space” education program, which promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA’s human spaceflight program.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

For information about NASA's education program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

-end-

Ann Marie Trotta
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1601
ann.marie.trotta@nasa.gov

Ciandra Jackson
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
ciandra.t.jackson@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Sonja Alexander
Aeronautics
July 17, 2013
13-219

NASA Announces 2013 Aeronautics Scholarship Recipients

WASHINGTON -- NASA has selected 25 students from across the nation to receive the agency's Aeronautics Scholarship for the 2013-2014 school year.

This scholarship program, which is in its sixth year, is designed to assist undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in fields of study related to aeronautics and aviation. Recipients were selected from hundreds of applications to the program.

"Future innovation in aeronautics is dependent on today's engineering students," said Jaiwon Shin, associate administrator for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate in Washington. "Developing new advances in air transportation is critical if the United States is to remain a world leader in aviation. As engineers, these scholars will be challenged to solve the problems facing the aviation industry as the demand for air travel increases."

The students will have the opportunity to intern with NASA researchers and work on developing technologies for managing air traffic more efficiently. In addition, they will work on technologies that reduce aircraft noise, fuel consumption and emissions, and improve air safety.

This year's recipients are enrolled at universities in California, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas and Wisconsin.

Undergraduate scholarship winners will receive $15,000 per year to cover tuition costs for two years and a $10,000 stipend during a summer internship with NASA. Graduate scholarship winners will receive approximately $45,000 per year for as many as three years and $10,000 stipends for as many as two summer internships. To maintain their scholarship awards, all recipients must continue to meet the academic standards of the universities they attend.

For a list of the 2013 scholarship recipients' names and their schools, visit: 

http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov/2013_scholarship_recipients.htm

 For more information about aeronautics research at NASA, visit: 

http://www.aeronautics.nasa.gov

 For information about NASA and its programs, visit: 

http://www.nasa.gov

-end-

Michael Braukus
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1979
michael.j.braukus@nasa.gov

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Beth Dickey
International Space Station
July 11, 2013
M13-108

NASA Astronaut Tom Marshburn Discusses Spaceflight at Newseum During Live Spacewalk

WASHINGTON -- NASA is inviting news media representatives to a discussion with astronaut Tom Marshburn from 8:00-9:30 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, July 16 at the Newseum in Washington.

Marshburn will appear in person to answer Newseum visitors' questions while astronauts Chris Cassidy of NASA and Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency are conducting a planned 6 1/2-hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station in Earth orbit. Gene Policinski, chief operating officer of the Newseum Institute, will moderate the program. 

Cassidy and Parmitano will venture outside the station's Quest airlock for assembly and maintenance work, as well as preparations for a new Russian module. The spacewalk begins at 8:10 a.m. and will be broadcast live on the Newseum's atrium screen.

Marshburn is the latest astronaut to perform a spacewalk and return to Earth. He has spent more than 24 hours on spacewalks, including 5 1/2 hours in May to fix an ammonia leak outside the space station. His first spaceflight was aboard space shuttle Endeavour during its space station assembly mission in July 2009. Marshburn returned to the space station as a flight engineer of Expeditions 34 and 35 from December to May.

Reporters interested in attending the event should contact Jonathan Thompson at 202-292-6353 or jothompson@newseum.org by noon on Monday, July 15. The Newseum is located at 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW in Washington. Media check-in will be located at the museum's group entrance on C Street NW.

When the Newseum opens to the public at 9 a.m., visitors with regular paid admission will be admitted to the final portion of the program. Seating is on a space-available basis.

For NASA TV live streams of the spacewalk and Newseum event, visit: 

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

 For Tom Marshburn's astronaut biography, visit: 

http://go.nasa.gov/Marshburn

 For more information about the Newseum, visit: 

http://www.newseum.org

-end-

Trent J. Perrotto
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
tperrotto@nasa.gov

Jonathan Thompson
Newseum, Washington
202-292-6353
jothompson@newseum.org

Last Updated: July 30, 2015
Editor: Beth Dickey